SWAT Literature Database for Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Title:Baseflow simulation using SWAT model in an inland river basin in Tianshan Mountains, Northwest China 
Authors:Luo, Y., J. Arnold, P. Allen and X. Chen 
Year:2012 
Journal:Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 
Volume:16 
Pages:1259-1267 
Article ID: 
DOI:10.5194/hess-16-1259-2012 
URL (non-DOI journals):http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/16/1259/2012/hess-16-1259-2012.html 
Model:SWAT (modified) & SWAT 
Broad Application Category:hydrologic only 
Primary Application Category:snowmelt and/or glacier melt processes 
Secondary Application Category:baseflow and other hydrologic component analysis 
Watershed Description:5,163 km^2 Manas River in the Tianshan Mountains in northwest China 
Calibration Summary: 
Validation Summary: 
General Comments:As of April 29, 2014 it appears that the DOI for this article is not working (but the URL does work). 
Abstract:Baseflow is an important component in hydrological modeling. The complex streamflow recession process complicates the baseflow simulation. In order to simulate the snow and/or glacier melt dominated streamflow receding quickly during the high-flow period but very slowly during the low-flow period in rivers in arid and cold northwest China, the current one-reservoir baseflow approach in SWAT (SoilWater Assessment Tool) model was extended by adding a slow- reacting reservoir and applying it to the Manas River basin in the Tianshan Mountains. Meanwhile, a digital filter program was employed to separate baseflow from streamflow records for comparisons. Results indicated that the tworeservoir method yielded much better results than the onereservoir one in reproducing streamflow processes, and the low-flow estimation was improved markedly. Nash-Sutcliff efficiency values at the calibration and validation stages are 0.68 and 0.62 for the one-reservoir case, and 0.76 and 0.69 for the two-reservoir case. The filter-based method estimated the baseflow index as 0.60, while the model-based as 0.45. The filter-based baseflow responded almost immediately to surface runoff occurrence at onset of rising limb, while the model-based responded with a delay. In consideration of watershed surface storage retention and soil freezing/thawing effects on infiltration and recharge during initial snowmelt season, a delay response is considered to be more reasonable. However, a more detailed description of freezing/thawing processes should be included in soil modules so as to determine recharge to aquifer during these processes, and thus an accurate onset point of rising limb of the simulated baseflow. 
Language:English 
Keywords: