SWAT Literature Database for Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Title:Modeling water and nitrogen dynamics from processing tomatoes under different management scenarios in the San Joaquin Valley of California 
Authors:Raij-Hoffman, I., K. Miller, G. Paul, Y. Yimam, S. Mehan, J. Dickey, T. Harter and I. Kisekka 
Year:2022 
Journal:Journal of Hydrology: Regional Studies 
Volume (Issue):43 
Pages: 
Article ID:101195 
DOI:10.1016/j.ejrh.2022.101195 
URL (non-DOI journals): 
Model:SWAT 
Broad Application Category:hydrologic and pollutant 
Primary Application Category:model comparison 
Secondary Application Category:crop, forest and/or vegetation growth/yield and/or parameters 
Watershed Description:Southern San Joaquin Valley (SSJV), which is characterised by: (1) mostly deep, heterogeneous, alluvial soils that range in texture from sand to clay and are mostly well-drained, (2) a Mediterranean climate (favorable for growing processing tomatoes) with hot, dry summers with a maximum average temperature between 32 and 37 ℃, average precipitation of 165–290 mm/year, and average reference evapotranspiration (ETo) of 1471 mm/year. 
Calibration Summary:Parameters were manually calibrated in an iterative process at the landscape scale, considering available literature and local knowledge. A landscape-scale manual crop model calibration approach was required because of the spatial and temporal complexity of cropping systems in this region, which is not adequately characterized for any one crop in any one region across a sufficient period of time to allow for a site-specific (i.e., field level) calibration approach. 
Validation Summary:Despite the differences between the water flow models in HYDRUS (2D/3D) and SWAT, percolation beyond the root zone was in good agreement between the two models for each soil and scenario. On average, lower percolation rates in HYDRUS (2D/3D) relative to SWAT in the coarser soils A and B were due to the systematically higher ET in HYDRUS (2D/3D). 
General Comments: 
Language:English 
Keywords:Nitrogen losses, Groundwater quality, HYDRUS (2D/3D)Soil, and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)